Behind the Springs podcast: COVID-19 Update from El Paso County’s Medical Director

Share this page:

We have officially entered the “Safer at Home” phase in our local response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Why can’t we just open everything up? When will we know if we can move to the next phase? Is there a light at the end of the tunnel? These are just a few of the questions Jen and Ted ask Dr. Robin Johnson, one of the leading health experts in the Pikes Peak region.  

Listen to the Podcast

 

Episode 22

Episode 22
Related Links

More from Behind the Springs

Episode 21: Be smart in our parks 
Pop Quiz! What does the “Safer At Home” phase mean for our parks, trails and open spaces? It means that things stay the same. They’re still open if you want to get outside … BUT we need you to spread out! Jen and Ted talk with the city’s parks director about some of the issues they’re dealing with and easy ways for you to find new parks and trails to explore.

Episode 20: Safer at home
Mayor Suthers talks about what the new “Safer At Home” phase means for local residents and he addresses important topics like the latest COVID-19 numbers in El Paso County, the city budget, and potential economic impacts lasting through the summer. He also offers the city’s thanks to everyone taking this pandemic seriously and to essential workers for all they’re doing for our community.

Episode 19: The show must go on
We’re not sticking to our schedule lately since nothing is quite the way it used to be. But we want to start bringing you podcasts as often as possible right now with important information about COVID-19 and the response in Colorado Springs. What questions do you still have? Have you heard positive stories of community support worth sharing? Please email us at BehindTheSprings@ColoradoSprings.gov. We will continue to keep you informed and hopefully, uplifted during this difficult time. 

Episode Transcripts

These transcripts are auto generated.

Ted

You probably noticed that we've been recording some of these episodes more frequently lately. That's because we have a lot of important information to share. Thank you for listening and for watching live on Facebook. Right now I'm Ted Skroback, and  

Jen                 

I'm Jen Schreuder and we're really fortunate to have Dr Robin Johnson with us for this episode. She is the medical director for the El Paso County Health Department, which is the main source of credible information in our region. If you have not checked out their website, we encourage you to do so. Al Paso County health dot org's and the El Paso County Health team has been working tirelessly to keep us safe and keep us informed, which is really the point of today. So, Dr Johnson, thank you for your time.  

Dr. Johnson                 

Thank you for the opportunity here.

Jen                 

And we wanted to start by talking about where we are right now in this new, safer at home phase. And I think people I would assume still have some questions about it and are feeling a little, Um, I don't know if the right word to use his restless, but I think some folks Aer feeling frustrated and restless and a bit impatient with when are we going to be able to get back to normal and it's not going to be, ah, free for all as we've heard from a lot of folks. But can you tell us about how our community is doing so far? I know we can't completely accurately assess that, but how are we doing? And why is it so important during this phase to stay the course?  

Dr. Johnson                 

Yeah, it's That is actually a really important aspect for us to focus on. And one of the things to focus on is that El Paso County actually is doing quite well. We have several points of data that we follow over time. One is our hospital capacity. The other is our testing capability, and then the third is our ability to to do the contact, tracing that we need to identify where there might be cases and because we have been able to develop those assets. Meanwhile, watching the number of cases in our county have plateau owed and even decreased to kind of a low, steady thrum, we're in a place to move into safer at home, where, um, not the other metropolitan areas in Colorado have not reached this milestone yet. So it's really encouraging. That being said, it's not that we get to throw the doors open and just all care to the wind. It's very, very important that we stay this course and think through it logically, with a staged and very well thought out strategy as to how we move into this next stage of stay for at home.

Ted                 

Well, and that's kind of leads into my question for you. Dr Johnson. Um, what are the points that you really want to stress as we are moving into this phase Two officially now, from stay at home to safer at home. What Our main points for El Paso County residents.

Dr. Johnson                 

So I think the main point is that we do get restless, particularly after a long winter and then a long winter in which we were staying at home. We want to get out and celebrate, and I think that there are very cautious ways we can continue to do that just strategically. Thinking forward, maintaining that six foot of distancing, wearing our masks when we're out in public, good hand hygiene. And if you do have symptoms or concerns to stay at home. But because we have increased testing, we're really asking individuals who are symptomatic to go ahead, get tested, help us follow where the pattern of this virus may be popping up so that we can do that case investigation and begin to understand mawr of its movement and where we can do some targeted testing Teoh and Target isolation quarantine to kind of squash those opportunities for it to begin spreading. And so, while we begin to step into some of these orders, even though the circle of 10 right there, we can move into having groups of 10. But that doesn't mean we go from 10 people at eight in the morning to 10 at 9 to 10 a 10 and then by the time we get to the end of the day, we have exposed ourselves to 80 people or more, it really is kind of starting with that core circle of ton. And then as we get out in time and see that we're doing well with that, we can begin to leverage that good, um data and expanded even further.  

Jen                 

When do you estimate that data to be available? Or how soon will we begin to know whether we're being effective in this face?  

Dr. Johnson                 

So we are planning on moving forward. So one of the things as we look forward is we know that we have to, I think, with best case scenarios. So we're prepared for the next stage As it comes. However, we're kind of held captive by this virus were on viral time, and we know the incubation period of this virus is two weeks. And so this week, even as we've opened on Friday to some retail and today with some businesses, I would not expect to see some increasing numbers because we still have our just in that first few days of incubation next week, we may, if we're going to we might see some increasing numbers, which is why, if you're symptomatic, it's so important to get tested so that we can trace that. And then that third week is when we'll really begin to see some of the evidence of whether we're being effective with continuing to open up the ability to interact. But doing so wisely with all of those parameters of, you know, continued physical distancing and the wearing of our mask washing her hands, etcetera.  

Jen                 

Are there any other misconceptions or misinformation out there you know that you would like to address of, like, that circle of 10 is a great point you made, Um, just that that you're hearing from people, that is that is incorrect. Yeah, I think one of the things that we hear is that well, I've been isolated at home, so I'm safe. It's okay if we just go ahead and give each other a hug, and that may be the case that you've been isolated. But as we opened these doors and we begin moving into some or interaction, that kind of close contact is still the contact where we're going to see transmission. And so, while you may have been isolating. I may have been exposed to somebody who is a health care worker. And so, just by the nature of it, even though they take all of their precautions, they've had more exposure. So that exposure for me is really and we do know that individuals consisting harbor the virus during their incubation period before their symptoms, they'll begin to shed virus. And so we want to just be cautious. And as we're still learning about this culprit,

Ted                 

well and Teoh keep talking a little bit about that circle of 10. Um, I also wanted to hit on the social distancing percentage that we've heard sometimes in the governor's press conferences for people that have been watching those, um, saying you know, 65% 0. R. So can you kind of explain that in layman terms for people so that they understand ah, where they're trying to come out when they say a social distancing percentage?

Dr. Johnson                 

Yeah, and that could become really confusing cause you start getting all of these mathematical numbers. And so the way that I really think about it is, um, if you and I were to, like, shake hands and we were, you know, just shaking hands generally with everybody, and we hadn't washed her hands in between. So, Jen, let's say you had already should shaken hands with Ted and Michelle and Frank. I basically now, by just shaking hands with you, have shake shaken hands with Ari other people so that one contact actually exposes me to four. So when we begin to open up these doors each exposure, you have to think of each person you're already. You know, you may not have that full circle of 10. They may have eight other people. So now that one person represents potentially nine individuals that you're exposed to, is that helpful?

Ted                 

Yeah, it's much

Dr. Johnson                 

more like social networking, right? It's

Ted                 

It's a viral social networking for  

Dr. Johnson                 

So that's true  

Jen                 

when it comes to the safer at home face to before we leave that topic, I do want to talk about businesses, you know, we've I've heard a lot of folks saying that some businesses air complying and doing this wonderful job and others are a little more lax and not not doing as good of a job. So, um, you know it would it would beg to ask the question of you know what's the best way for the community to handle that. And I would assume we want people to we want encourage people to go to those businesses that are complying.  

Dr. Johnson                 

Yes, I think one of the strongest voices that we have is voting with our actions. So we certainly can, um you know, there's a call line at El Paso County public health if you are concerned about something, but even more so, Teoh, Um, maybe voice very respectfully your concerns and some of that voicing of your concern be can be that you do not frequent that business. If you notice that they're not complying, Um, and you have the choice to go next door to the other retailer or business that is following the guidelines, vote with your actions and utilize those businesses that do have those guidelines set in place and help you to facilitate doing the right thing yourself.  

Jen                 

And that does two things. I mean, it sets the right example, but it's also for your own safety.  

Dr. Johnson                 

Yes, absolutely. OK,

Ted                 

well, and we like to get a little personal, sometimes on behind springs, So I know we're trying to answer a lot of questions for viewers and listeners right now. Ah, about the virus and about what El Paso County is doing. But I want to touch a little bit on you yourself through this because I've been watching you since day one that this is really hit locally. Um, how are you doing? Just to put it nicely. What has your life turned into day to day? Ah, change from what the day to day used to be.

Jen                 

That's an unprecedented situation for you.  

Dr. Johnson                 

So, um, it has been pretty interesting. So as medical director, I have been working from home, Um, and typically have only been leaving the house to get a walk in each day. Um, and then also, when I have press conferences like this, S O otherwise have really been working from my office. That has been, um I have a lot of zoom fatigue, as people call it, but it's also been fairly phenomenal cause I have watched the spring come. I have ah, 100 year old maple outside my window and have watched it. But in the birds court each other and eat the buds and even the leaves begin to come out and some other things that I have typically missed because I've been in another office. So that part has been, um, actually fairly delightful and and a secondary benefit, I think the other pieces that, um my I have one son who lives in Scotland's and one up in Fort Collins. And so we talk actually more often, and we tend to face time a lot. My daughters living home. But she is a CNN A. So she's very careful about self isolating because her clientele is very high risk. Um, and she'll be entering her third year of nursing school. So what began her clinic, ALS, which will put her in a different risk category, particularly as she starts when we may have another surgeon that my husband is actually an intensive ist. He works in the hospital in the I C. U. So he and I, um, have created a routine that minimizes any exposure that he may have picked up the hospital and come home and we can get into details of the chicken strip that we call it. Well, yeah.  

Ted                 

Okay. What's the chicken strips? You know, you brought it up. We got to know what the chicken strip is

Dr. Johnson                 

So when he comes home, you know he's been in the hospital and and it's actually they. This is their wheelhouse. They are all about infection control, Yes, and he's wearing PPE and all of that. But he steps into the back bathroom and just takes off anything that he's had on while he's in the hospital and then goes up and showers. And, um, all of those things go into a bag, which we then put into the laundry machine, um, immediately, just so that there's no risk that he inadvertently would have brought something home. And

Ted                 

it sounds like you guys there are a the all American medical ah, couple and family and then being being very cautious with everything which, you know, you're you're definitely leading by example through this through this situation. But I think it's great what you're saying about. You can look out on that great maple tree and, ah, and be able to really, I bet that kind of takes you away from what's going on. Sometimes, um, we'll

Jen                 

need to take a break every once in a while. It's a lot of information,  

Dr. Johnson                 

and there's such a variety of birds here in Colorado that you don't necessarily get a picture off. But if you start at 5 30 in the morning as they wake up and watch them, um, anyway, there's so people may put on this podcast, but they could be looking at their birds.

Ted                 

That's sure. I think I think we're giving people a

Jen                 

lot of great about have fine about speaking of balance. I know people are, as we talked about their impatience and trying to balance doing what's good for the community and also what's good for their own mental health and that sort of thing. What what are we looking t in terms of for the end? Are we are we striving toward a vaccine? Are we trying to just maintain? Are we trying to get to that next phase? You know, what should people be thinking in terms of motivating them forward and keeping our community moving forward?  

Dr. Johnson                 

Absolutely, that those are really important things, because I do think we need to know that there's a light at the end of the tunnel that this isn't an all or nothing equation, right? That it has some points that are participation can make a huge difference. So by the social isolation of the stay at home order. What we achieved was just to put a damper on something that had was was raising up as an uncontrolled free for all infection, right? So we know that there's this baseline infection, and now, by stepping into it strategically and opening up our doors with e opportunity, the tools that we do have it are ready to test. Do that case, um, investigation and then going ahead with isolation and quarantine, knowing that we also have hospital capacity to care for people who are having were severe reactions, we actually will begin building some herd immunity, so we anticipate there's going to be some cases. But most of the recommendations have been around, you know, monitoring yourself in your own risk. And as we build some internal community herd immunity, we'll have fewer cases. Do that and and we'll have some protection for those that are higher risk. Because those of us who have gained some immunity can stand kind of in that gap so that it doesn't spread wildly from A to B to C. It would have to go all the way from a somewhere down the alphabet before it could even find purchase toe begin infecting someone. The next thing is mean, and we'll understand more in depth as we understand our antibodies in the immunity that they do and for how long that immunity might be, for whether it's going to be something that waxes and wanes over time or something that is more like when we get our measles vaccine, which can be a lifetime of immunity. So there's some answers to be yet known. The second thing is, we are giving time for science to catch up because we talked like this. Virus has a two week incubation. There are some things we can not rush. It just is within that kind of time window, and we have to kind of rest there. And so science catching up could absolutely bring us a vaccine which would enhance that herd immunity and particularly as we would invite people to step into getting their vaccine, it gives them the opportunity to think through all of the other vaccines we should beginning our influenza vaccine come this fall is going to be offered again and again. It offers, if not complete, some partial immunity and also creates herd immunity for those who are more vulnerable in our community. It also gives us time for the development of some of the therapeutics that we've been talking about. And there are some hopeful, um, medications on the horizon while rims ra miss it, dear. And I'm saying this wrong, I am so sorry. But it's an antiviral that was developed for Ebola has been tested. It has very, um, the one study that we actually have that shows, um some benefit is just shortening that course by four days, and that may not sound like an awful lot, but if you're really sick, that could be a big deal. The other thing that it does, though, is it tells our scientists where this virus may be vulnerable and so helps them to look at other medications in their arsenal. For development to say, you know, either to the virus you shall not pass, you don't get to infect or once it does, to be able to target and say, we're gonna butch out right. So there's a lot to be developed in this interim, and the more that we stay the course, the war that we protect ourselves each other. The rest of our community, while we're shoring up the whole job of public health and our clinicians and our scientists is to get more tools in our toolbox so that we have a fair fight on our hands.

Ted                 

Well, speaking of the tools in the toolbox, obviously one of those front line tools is testing. You mentioned it a few times already in this interview. Um, for people that are wondering, or maybe, you know, they feel symptoms or whatever it might be. Can you give some people ideas of where they can go to get the tests? It sounds like, um, our test mawr easily obtainable now?

Dr. Johnson                 

Yes, and there should be tests available for anyone who is symptomatic. Um, and there's discussion for even broadening that. I mean, we just want to make sure that we have the resources to be sustainable. Um, so at this time, it's anyone who's symptomatic. You see, health has a mobile site that you can drive up to its off of uhm union at Prentiss Parkway. Peak Vista also has a mobile site. I know that Peak Vista and Optimum and Matthews Vu all are offering tests through there primary care offices. So if you call ahead toe, let them know you're coming, they can have a test available for you. And then they're clinicians can wear the appropriate PPE to protect their offices, Um, and as well as the hospital's Centera and UH health within some of their primary clinics in and elsewhere. So if you are feeling symptomatic, I think the first place to start really is calling your primary care physician. If you don't have a primary care or they're not offering it at the El Paso County health, not organ. We have a list of places that you couldn't go to get that test and we would really encourage, Um and in the most sensitive of time period to get tested is in that 1st 5 to 7 days of symptoms. So if you can get in, then when we have, ah, higher sensitivity rate and it just really does help one protect you and those that you love, cause then you know, Teoh isolate, but also that contact tracing so we can assure that we're intervening before spread of the virus.  

Jen                 

We're not having those large outbreak.  

Dr. Johnson                 

Yeah, yeah, the goal

Ted                 

is there anything else? Ah, we already kind of looking in the future at the end of the tunnel for this, and I don't mean to be doomsday, but is there a fear that this kid, you tater there could be another strain that comes along, um, within the next couple of years or something along those lines where we're kind of back to square one.

Dr. Johnson                 

So, um, I think with with viruses I mean, there's always a chance that they can, um it has not Historically, Corona virus is a different family of viruses than, like, say, influenza, Um, and doesn't tend to change its coat. I talk about, um, you know, the the family of influenza is the same, but every season they change the color of their coats because they're trying to mask themselves. So it might be maroon this year and red next year. So you might not recognize it completely, but you'd at least have some partial recognition That hasn't necessarily been the case with Corona virus. But we do know that we've had several war severe corona viruses in the last decade or so. And so is there a chance of that? Yes. Um, but is Is that something that we, um, need to be prepared for? Absolutely. But we get in our car every day. We put our seat belt on and we drive, knowing that were more likely to run into, um, a car accidents, then many other things in the day. And so the main thing we're going to do is to really follow the data, follow prevention, do the right things where your seat belt and and that is what public health and I think clinicians and scientists are really looking to do for our community. But it does take a full community effort. All of us have a rule here to play. And while we can get impatient if we can, you know, take a deep breath and really focus on what we're getting to Dio and not necessarily all the things that we're not but really thinking about, You know that there is an awful lot to be grateful for, and I think each morning starting with some of those things of, you know, where have we come from and the site that we do have a vision of where we're going and in the right there, we're going in the right direction? Absolutely. And I think the more study that we stay on this, the more encouragement and the better for a psychology. One of the worst things is kind of that all or nothing attitude. It's all on or it's all off and the uncertainty that that develops within us. So if we can stay on a steady course together with some really encouraging civil discourse, um, and see that we have continued results from all of our hard work, there's nothing that can be more encouraging than that, even if the course is slow. So I encourage us all to continue because, um, actually, El Paso County has done a pretty phenomenal job, and I'm anticipating that will stay the course.

Ted                 

Well, you guys are doing great work, and I won't end it on the doomsday question. Let me end it on this question. What earth? The positive takeaways that you think you're gonna You're either already seeing or you're gonna take away at the end of all of this.

Dr. Johnson                 

You know, some of the positive, I think have been just the response of our community. As we've begun toe. Look at what it means to stay safer at home. The business is reaching out to say, What does this look like? Give us guidance. How can we do this responsibly? How do we empower our employees and our patrons? Um, the same thing with, um the schools and looking to have some way to really acknowledge the events of graduation and the hard work and what that means. But to do so responsibly. Um, I think that all of those sort of, ah reasonable, thoughtful and articulate individuals in our community that come representing agencies are for me, as you know, medical director. Probably the most encouraging news because I realized that I have a community team along with us and that people are really engaged in this end, are willing to do the right things. And and they're incredibly bright, um, and passionate about this and and compassionate and compassion. Absolutely. And and I think that's the biggest hope is that we do have neighbors and friends. We're all in this together.

Ted                 

One your personal positive must be that you get to see spring in a whole different way this year. Absolutely

Jen                 

got to find the little positives. That's really

Dr. Johnson                 

thank you so much.  

Jen                 

Thank you for your time.

Ted                 

Yeah, Thank you. You've been such a calming presence, I think, for our community locally, here, throughout the different press conferences and whatnot and sitting through all of our tough questions here with Jenna Data. No, we're not too bad, right? Jen, you want to remind people where they can find the best Internet find

Jen                 

you even though we sound a little bit like a broken record. But El Paso County health dot orgasm is a wonderful resource for all of your questions. And, you know, even though I know I've heard a lot of folks say, You know, I just I can't listen to anything more about it. It is important for you to stay upto date on what safer at home does mean and at least educate yourself on the basic so that you know the proper

Jen                 

precautions to take as you do start to venture out and, you know, start that little circle of 10. So we appreciate you tuning in with us, and then also we encourage you to email us a behind the springs at colorado springs dot gov. If there are story ideas that we can share or if they're topics that you would like to hear addressed on this podcast.

Ted                 

Yes, and I'll be the broken record. Now, make sure that you are rate liking and subscribing. We aren't coming out with episodes every other Tuesday. Right now we're coming out with them on random days, like like today. So make sure you're subscribed on your favorite podcast platform and thank you again

Ted                 

for watching and listening to behind the springs.

Subscribe to City News

Get a weekly update of news, events and upcoming public meetings from the City of Colorado Springs.